Making your events mean more to donors

Your fundraising event can benefit from a few strategic decisions.

Public and religious broadcasters have a lot to gain from hosting events for their contributors. While broadcasters already have a significant advantage over many other nonprofits in terms of how frequently listeners tune in and engage with the station, meeting the audience in person can offer some unique benefits as well. When planning these events, your nonprofit has to make sure it’s appealing and relevant for donors and successfully entertains, informs and otherwise interests them. This approach sets the stage to encourage contributions during the event and make the time and effort that went into its planning and execution worthwhile.

Be detailed and critical when planning the event

“Public and religious broadcasters have a lot to gain from hosting events for their contributors.”

There are so many variables involved with a successful donor event that it’s best to start planning early and regularly review the decisions made and remaining actions needed before the event starts. By using a critical eye and referring to the goals set for the event, you can avoid problems related to everything from inefficient spending to disconnects between the types of donors attending and the amenities offered. Network for Good said an eye for detail is vital, both to avoid confusing mistakes – like printing the wrong date or day of the week on invitations – and to encourage as much attendance as possible.

If the event includes any sort of interactive process, be it a fundraising activity or just fun and games to reward contributors, it’s best to make the specific nature of every piece clear. When guests know what to expect before arriving, there’s less confusion and fewer questions for your staff to field in the time leading up to the event.

Lean on peer leadership

One effective donor management technique to consider for an event is the use of a host committee and committee chairpersons. As suggested by The Fundraising Authority, this strategy involves using high-level donors, leaders in the local or regional economy or area celebrities to take on a specific role: encouraging gifts from other attendees. They can also be used to encourage attendance in general, especially if tickets are priced instead of free.

While your staff and volunteers will handle the logistical concerns of the event and likely cross over into fundraising efforts before and during it, having a host committee takes a major burden off of everyone’s shoulders. With knowledgeable, high-level contributors and notable people leading the effort to encourage contributions, your event has a better chance of realizing success.